Bio of WJ Li

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1 Page Bio

Wen Jung LI joined the Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering of the City University of Hong Kong (CityU) in November 2011.  Prior to joining CityU, he was with the Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering (MAE) of The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) since September 1997. At CUHK, he headed the Centre for Micro and Nano Systems from 2002 to 2011.  He was educated at the University of Southern California (BS Aerospace Engineering ‘87; MS Aerospace Engineering ‘89) and the University of California, Los Angeles (PhD ‘97, Aerospace Engineering).  Before joining CUHK, he held R&D positions at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Pasadena, USA, where he worked on silicon-based gyroscopes for inter-planetary exploration applications), at The Aerospace Corporation (El Segundo, USA, where he participated in US defense-related projects such as “Star Wars” and on Titan Launch Vehicle programs), and at Silicon Microstructures Inc. (Fremont, USA, where he helped developed one of the world’s first commercial silicon-based capacitive accelerometers). His research group has published more than 280 technical papers related to MEMS and Nanotechnology (with an h-index of 26; an i10-index of 73; with more than 2,600 citations as of December 17, 2012, according to Google Scholar). His research work has consistently received international recognition, i.e., his group has won several prestigious IEEE conference prizes such as the Best Conference/Student awards from IEEE-ROBIO (2011, 2007), IEEE/ASME-AIM (2007), IEEE-ICRA (2003), and IEEE-NANO (2003). He is recognized worldwide for his contributions in carbon nanotube-based sensors and has been invited to give lectures at major international meetings related to sensors and robotics. Several of his research papers have been featured on journal covers and have received wide attention . For example, his recent work on MEMS-based gesture recognition has become one of the top 25 downloaded papers (for 3 months in a row) of the IEEE Sensor Journal since its inception in 2001. In terms of editorial services, Prof. Li has served as a guest editor for the IEEE Trans. on Automation Science and Engineering, the IEEE/ASME Trans. on Mechatronics, and the IEEE Sensors Journal on special topics related to MEMS and Nanotechnology. He is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine, editorial board member of Micromachines, and an associate editor of the Journal of Micro-Bio Robotics.

Prof. Li’s research team has been continually funded by both basic and applied research agencies in Hong Kong and China, including the Hong Kong Research Grants Council, the Hong Kong Innovation and Technology Commission, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the National Natural Science Foundation of China, and the Chinese National 863 Plan.  He has served as the principal investigator for more than 25 projects funded by these agencies since 1999.  Prof. Li has also been very active in serving the educational, professional, and commercial sectors in Hong Kong and at the international level. He served as the Undergraduate Admissions Coordinator for MAE and is the founding Program Director of both the MSc in Biomedical Engineering and the MSc in Mechanical and Automation Engineering programs at CUHK. He was the Program Chair for IEEE-ROBIO 2004 (China), General Chair for IEEE-ROBIO 2005 (Hong Kong), Organizing Chair for the 1st IEEE-NEMS (2006, China), General Chair for IEEE-NANO 2007 (Hong Kong), and General Chair for IEEE-NMDC 2012 (Hawaii, USA). He served as the VP of Conferences for the IEEE Nanotechnology Council from January 2011 to December 2012. He was a Distinguished Overseas Scholar (百人计划) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and is currently also an adjunct professor at CUHK.  Additionally, he serves currently as a guest professor at Peking University and at the Huazhong University of Science and Technology. Through the successful completion of his Innovation Technology Fund projects, he has also co-founded two startup companies commercializing MEMS-based human motion sensing technologies at the Hong Kong Science Park. Prof. Li has recently been elected as an IEEE Fellow (2010) for his contributions in low-power integrated nanotube sensors and also as an ASME Fellow (2011) for his contributions in micro power generators.

Short Bio for Journal Papers (IEEE Transactions format)

Wen J. LI has been with the Dept. Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering of the City University of Hong Kong (CityU) since November of 2011.  Prior to joining CityU, he headed the Centre for Micro and Nano Systems at The Chinese University of Hong Kong since September 1997.  He was educated at the University of Southern California (BSAE 87’; MSAE 89’) and the University of California, Los Angeles (PhD 97’, in Aerospace Engineering). His industrial experience includes The Aerospace Corporation (El Segundo, CA), NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Pasadena, CA), and Silicon Microstructures Inc. (Fremont, CA). He currently serves as the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine and is a Fellow of the IEEE. His research interest is in nanoscale fabrication, sensing and manipulation.

Short Bio for Journal Papers (Non-IEEE journals)

Wen J. Li received his BSAE and MSAE degrees from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, in 1987 and 1989, respectively, and his Ph.D. degree from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1997. He is currently a professor in the Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering at the City University of Hong Kong (CityU).  Prior to joining CityU, he was with The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK), where he headed the Centre for Micro and Nano Systems. Before joining CUHK, he held R&D positions at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Pasadena, CA), The Aerospace Corporation (El Segundo, CA), and Silicon Microstructures, Inc. (Fremont, CA). Dr. Li has served as a guest editor for the IEEE Trans. on Automation Science and Engineering, the IEEE/ASME Trans. on Mechatronics, and the IEEE Sensors Journal on special topics related to MEMS and Nanotechnology. He is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine. He was elected IEEE Fellow in 2010 for his contribution in low power integrated carbon nanotube sensors. He was also elected ASME Fellow in 2011 for his contributions in micro power generators.

Short Bio for Invited Talks

Wen J. Li received his BSAE and MSAE degrees from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, in 1987 and 1989, respectively, and his Ph.D. degree from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1997. He is currently a professor in the Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering at the City University of Hong Kong (CityU).  Prior to joining CityU, he was with The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK), where he headed the Centre for Micro and Nano Systems. Before joining CUHK in 1997, he held R&D positions at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Pasadena, CA), The Aerospace Corporation (El Segundo, CA), and Silicon Microstructures, Inc. (Fremont, CA).  His research work has continually received international recognition through winning several prestigious IEEE conference awards such as the Best Conference/Student Paper awards from IEEE-ROBIO (2011, 2007), IEEE/ASME-AIM (2007), IEEE-ICRA (2003), and IEEE-NANO (2003). He has served as a guest editor for the IEEE Trans. on Automation Science and Engineering, the IEEE/ASME Trans. on Mechatronics, and the IEEE Sensors Journal on special topics related to MEMS and Nanotechnology. He is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine.  He has co-founded two start-up companies at the Hong Kong Science Park commercializing products based on MEMS motion sensors.  He is a guest professor at Peking University and Huazhong University of Science and Technology, and also an affiliated professor at the Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences.  He was elected IEEE Fellow in 2010 for his contribution in low power integrated carbon nanotube sensors. He was also elected ASME Fellow in 2011 for his contributions in micro power generators.